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The cost of going into a care home

01 February 2018

Lauren Smith

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The costs of care can vary drastically depending on where you live and the amount of care you need. The cost of a care home covers things like your accommodation, meals and laundry and the facilities provided by that particular home. However, the costs will not necessarily include various activities, for example, any trips run by the home or any specific personal requests that you may have.

Across South Yorkshire, the costs of residential care ranges from £400 - £1500 per week. Nursing care can cost even more, yet some people who require nursing care will receive ‘Funded Nursing Care'. The rules are extremely complex and do vary depending on your individual circumstances.

Many peoples primary concern is their property, as this is usually their most valuable asset. If you live on your own, then the value of your property will be taken into account when assessing your ability to contribute towards the costs of care fees.

If however, you live with:
- Your spouse or partner
- A close relative aged over 60
- A close relative under 60 and incapacitated, or
- A child under 16 who you are responsible for supporting
then your property will be disregarded when assessing you for care fees funding.

Lauren Smith, Head of Wills, Trusts and Probate in our Sheffield office says, "One of the most common concerns that people have when coming to see me is that the money they have worked hard for may not end up passing to their loved ones. This could be for many reasons, including divorce or bankruptcy or going into a care home. Many people worry that due to the high cost of care their money will run out and they will not be able to help their families in the way that they had hoped. People often think that they can give their assets away to fulfil their wishes to support their families. However, there are rules relating to gifts that people make during their lifetime, not only for tax purposes but also from a care fees point of view. If you give away assets and then later try to rely on care fees funding the gifts you have made could be deemed to be a deliberate deprivation of capital and your care fees funding removed. The attached article highlights one recent case in which the local authority tried to argue this should occur."

https://www.step.org/news/uk-regular-cash-gifts-did-not-prove-deliberate-deprivation-assets

For further advice call Lauren on 0114 272 1884 to arrange an appointment